General Education Curriculum


GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS
Language Literacy ................................................................. 12 hours

English ....................................................................... 9 hours

ENG 1301 Composition and Rhetoric 3 hours
Prerequisite: As indicated by the Texas Wesleyan University English Placement Exam or satisfactory completion of ENG 0300 Designed to encourage critical reading and thinking, this course establishes the components of the writing process, familiarizes students with basic rhetorical vocabulary, introduces elements of the various discourse communities and their conventions, and introduces students to the role of technology in research and writing. In order to succeed, students must demonstrate proficiency in word processing and computer searches. Must be taken within a student’s first 30 hours.

ENG 1302 Composition and Literature 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 1301
Building on rhetorical principles learned in ENG 1301, this course further explores the role of the writer as a critical reader by focusing on the dominant genres of literature: fiction, poetry, drama, and essays. Students gain a better understanding of composition by writing explications and analyses as they learn to establish researched critical positions. Must be taken within a student’s first 30 hours.

one of the following courses:

ENG 2301 Survey of World Literature I 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 1301 and 1302 Representative writings in the literature of the Eastern and Western worlds from the ancient periods through the Renaissance.

ENG 2302 Survey of World Literature II 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 1301 and 1302 Representative writings in the literature of the Eastern and Western worlds since the Renaissance.

ENG 2311 Survey of English Literature 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 1301 and 1302 Representative major figures from the Old English period through the Age of Classicism.

ENG 2312 Survey of English Literature I 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 1301 and 1302 Representative major figures from the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries.

ENG 2321 Survey of American Literature I 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 1301 and 1302 Representative writers from the Colonials to the Transcendentalists.

ENG 2322 Survey of American Literature II 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 1301 and 1302 Representative writers since the Transcendentalists.

Interdisciplinary Integrative Course ............................. 3 hours

choose one course:

HUM 2340 The Human Experience I 3 hours
Prerequisite: 45 credit hours. This course is offered in the fall and summer semesters. It may not be substituted for HUM 3340. An interdisciplinary synthesis of selected events, ideas, and expressions of the oral, visual, and literary arts, from the emergence of civilization through the mid-seventeenth century, emphasizing analysis of values and concerns inherited from the past and encountered by students in their personal experiences.

HUM 2341 The Human Prospect I 3 hours
Prerequisite: 45 credit hours. This course is offered in the spring and summer semesters. It may not be substituted for HUM 3340. An interdisciplinary synthesis of selected events, ideas, and expressions of the oral, visual, and literary arts, from the shaping of the "modern" world in the seventeenth century through the present day, emphasizing analysis of values and concerns that shape contemporary society and are encountered by students in their personal experiences.

Analytic Literacy .............................................................. 10-11 hours

Choose one option: Option #1: two math / one science (10 hours) Option #2: one math / two sciences (11 hours)

Mathematics: MAT 1302, MAT 1304 (if allowed by major), or any math course with MAT 1302 or higher as a prerequisite (excluding MAT 1304)

Note: MAT 1304 is acceptable for all programs in the School of Natural and Social Sciences except for the programs in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, and Mathematics. MAT 1304 is acceptable for all programs in the School of Arts and Letters and the School of Education. MAT 1304 is not acceptable for any program in the School of Business and Professional Programs.

 

MAT 1302 College Algebra 3 hours Prerequisite: As indicated by the Texas Wesleyan University Mathematics Placement Exam or MAT 0301 at Texas Wesleyan University Co-requisite: MAT 1302L Set theory, real and complex number system, quadratic equations, quadratic formula, equations involving radicals, inequalities, graphs of quadratic and rational functions, logarithmic functions, exponential functions, theory of equations, matrices and determinants, and mathematical induction.

MAT 1304 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts 3 hours Prerequisite: As indicated by the Texas Wesleyan University Mathematics Placement Exam or MAT 0301 at Texas Wesleyan UniversityAn introduction to some of the most important ideas in mathematics that both provide basic skills and illustrate the power and nature of mathematics. Topics include problem solving, set theory, logic, mathematical systems, number theory, theory of equations and inequalities, function theory, graphing, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, and an introduction to probability and statistics.

Science: Choose 1 or 2 of the following courses with accompanying lab: BIO 1321 and 1121, BIO 1322 and 1122, BIO 1340 and 1140, BIO 1341 and 1141, CHE 1315 and 1115, CHE 1316 and 1116, GEO 1401, GEO 1402, NSC 1403, NSC 1404, NSC 1405, NSC 1406, NSC 1407, NSC 1408, NSC 1409, NSC 1410, NSC 1412, NSC 1414, NSC 2401, NSC 2402, PHY 1401, PHY 1402

BIO 1321 Introduction to Cell Biology 3 hours Prerequisite: placement in ENG 1301 (or higher) and MAT 0301 (or higher) and concurrent enrollment or credit in BIO 1121 This is the first course of the Biology Core. This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of biology and focuses on basic biochemistry and the organization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. This course must be taken concurrently with the associated laboratory course, BIO 1121. and BIO 1121 Introduction to Cell Biology Laboratory 1 hour Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or credit in BIO 1321 A laboratory course survey that focuses on the acquisition of basic research techniques and their application to selected laboratory projects. These projects will cover a variety of topics in basic cell biology. Biology 1121 is the companion lab course for Biology 1321. One three-hour meeting per week.

BIO 1322 Introduction to Genetics 3 hours Prerequisite: Biology 1321 and concurrent enrollment or credit in BIO 1122 An introduction to the structure and operation of genes as they are expressed in cells, organisms and populations. and BIO 1122 Introduction to Genetics Laboratory 1 hour Prerequisite: BIO 1121 and concurrent enrollment or credit in BIO 1322 A laboratory course survey that focuses on the acquisition of basic research techniques and their application to selected laboratory projects. These projects will cover a variety of topics in basic genetics. BIO 1122 is to be taken as a companion course for BIO 1322. One 3-hour laboratory per week.

BIO 1340 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3 hours Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or credit in BIO 1140 This course will be dedicated to “constructing the human organism” beginning with the basic building block of the body, the cell. Subsequently, other systems vital to the construction process will be examined including, but not limited to, the skeletal, muscular, nervous, gastrointestinal and integumentary systems. and BIO 1140 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory 1 hour Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or credit in BIO 1340 The course will consist of laboratory observations, data collection and analysis about human cell structure and function body, the structure of bone and the organization of the skeleton, the skin, muscles of the upper and the lower body, the spinal cord and nerves and the brain and cranial nerves, as well as the digestive system. Students will keep records of observations in a laboratory notebook.

BIO 1341 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3 hours Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or credit in BIO 1141 The course is dedicated to the “integrative systems” of the human body that facilitate nutrient delivery, waste removal, and the proliferation of life. Topics that will be examined include, but are not limited to, the respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, endocrine, renal, and reproductive system. and BIO 1141 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory 1 hour Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or credit in BIO 1341 This course will cover scientific method and measurement and involve laboratory observation and data collection about respiratory volumes and capacities, structure of the heart, the cardiac cycle, pulse rate and blood pressure, the functional anatomy of the lymphatic system, humoral factors governing homeostasis, the structure and function of the kidney and male and female reproductive biology. Students will keep records of observations in a laboratory notebook.

CHE 1315 General Chemistry I 3 hours Prerequisite: High school chemistry; concurrent enrollment in CHE 1115 and MAT 1302 A one-semester lecture course emphasizing the laws and theories of composition, structure, properties, and transformation of matter. Emphasis is placed on the stoichiometric relationships of inorganic substances. Three lecture hours per week. and CHE 1115 General Chemistry Laboratory I 1 hour Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHE 1315 and MAT 1302 A one-semester laboratory course covering the empirical approaches to problem solving, emphasizing the collection, evaluation, and interpretation of experimental measurements in determinations of chemical relationships, with emphasis on inorganic chemistry. One 3-hour laboratory per week.

CHE 1316 General Chemistry II 3 hours Prerequisite: CHE 1315, concurrent enrollment in CHE 1116 A three-credit freshman level General Chemistry course that is a continuation of Chemistry 1315. Students will study advanced atomic structure and bonding concepts, acid-base theory, kinetics and equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and the chemistry of some elements. Three lecture hours per week. and CHE 1116 General Chemistry Laboratory II 1 hour Prerequisite: CHE 1315, concurrent enrollment in CHE 1316 A laboratory course designed to illustrate the fundamental principles covered in CHE 1315 and 1316, including experiments related to thermodynamics, kinetics, acid-base, synthesis, quantitative and qualitative analysis and to introduce basic techniques used in analytical chemistry. One 3-hour laboratory per week.

GEO 1401 Principles of Physical Geology 4 hours Principles and processes of physical geology with special emphasis on field aspects, such as identification of minerals, rocks, rock formations, and geological processes. Introduction to plate tectonics. Includes laboratory.

GEO 1402 Historical Geology 4 hours Age-by-age reconstruction of geologic history with emphasis on the paleontological evidence in the earth's crust. Laboratory and field trips will examine fossils and depositional environments.

NSC 1403 The Nature of Physical Science 4 hours A non-mathematical introduction to the principles and concepts of classical, modern, and applied physical sciences emphasizing an understanding of their role and significance in modern society. This course includes 2 hours of laboratory per week.

NSC 1404 Physical Science and the Environment 4 hours Topics include concepts of energy and the impact of energy usage on the environment. This course includes 2 hours of laboratory per week.

NSC 1405 Meteorology, Oceanography, and Space Science 4 hours Prerequisite: Either permission of the instructor or 6 hours of laboratory science, recommended NSC 1403 and 1406 Introduction to the principles of climate, weather, oceanic processes, ocean floor topography, basic geologic processes, and astronomy. Three 1-hour class periods and one 3-hour laboratory per week. This course is suggested for prospective K-12 teachers interested in teaching science.

NSC 1406 Contemporary Biology 4 hours Basic principles of science as exemplified by contemporary topics in the life sciences. Laboratory exercises will give students experience in the application of scientific methodology. Three hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week.

NSC 1407 Animal Life 4 hours Topics include animal structure, function, and natural history. Laboratory exercises will give students experience in the application of scientific methodology. Three hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week.

NSC 1408 Plants and Human Affairs 4 hours An introduction to plants, emphasizing their importance to human life. Laboratory exercises will give students experience in the application of scientific methodology. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

NSC 1409 Cracking the Code: a User’s Guide to Human Genetics 4 hours An exploration of human genetics and its application to medicine, historical questions, anthropology, human cloning and forensic investigations. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is offered online for laboratory science credit.

NSC 1410 Local Spring Flora 4 hours Fundamental principles and practice of collecting, identifying, and preserving wild flowers. This course is offered cross-terms on weekends during late spring and early summer and cannot be taken by seniors who expect to graduate in May.

NSC 1412 Mind and Body: Exploring Human Biology 4 hours This course is designed to explore the process of scientific discovery as illustrated by the complex workings of the human body. Students will be introduced to the scientific method as illustrated by the design and interpretation of key experiments that have led to critical discoveries about how the human body functions. This course will also examine the impact that these discoveries have had on modern society. The goal of this course is to foster an understanding of how scientific discoveries are made and to underscore the important role that science plays in our society. Laboratory exercises will reinforce important concepts and introduce students to experimental design and analysis. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

NSC 1414 Cats, Chromosomes and Codons: Genetics at Second Life 4 hours Prerequisite: Students enrolling in this course must qualify for TWU English 1301 and Math 0301 or their equivalents at another institution. This user’s guide to genetics and the human genome will be taught entirely online at Genome Island, an educational simulation at Second Life. Students will conduct virtual experiments to collect and analyze data that illuminate the principles of genetics and its application to humans. Topics studied will include the structure and replication of DNA, genetic coding and genetic variation, Mendelian inheritance patterns, human chromosomal organization, and features of the human genome, including specific human genes.

NSC 2401 Forensics I 4 hours Prerequisite: any science course The objective of this course is to provide an introduction to criminalistics and forensic science for nonscientists. This course introduces the science of forensics, the crime scene and physical evidence, evidence as a link between crime and victim or crime and perpetrator, evidence collection and analysis, classes of physical evidence and the techniques and instruments used to analyze them.

NSC 2402 Forensics II 4 hours Prerequisite: NSC 2401 The objective of this course is to complete the introduction to crimnalistics and forensic science for nonscientists. This course builds upon the introduction to the science of forensics, the crime scene and physical evidence and evidence linking crime and victim or crime and perpetrator and evidence collection and analysis. This course will develop a firm grounding in understanding the classes of biological and physical anthropological evidence and the techniques and instruments used to analyze them.

PHY 1401 University Physics I 4 hours Prerequisite: MAT 1324 (may be taken concurrently), MAT 1302 for EXS majors, or consent of instructor Mechanics of solids, liquids, gases, and the phenomena of heat. Three lecture hours per week and one 3- hour laboratory per week.

PHY 1402 University Physics II 4 hours Prerequisite: MAT 1324 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor Electricity and magnetism, wave motion, and elements of modern physics. Three lecture hours per week and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

Cultural Literacy .................................................................... 12 hours

HIS 2322 Fundamentals of Modern American History, 1877 to Present 3 hours This course will enable students to develop and demonstrate an adequate survey knowledge and understanding of American geography, politics, society, culture, economics, ideas, and beliefs from 1876 to the present.

Choose 3 hours from one of the following: Art (ART), Fine Arts (FAR), Music (MUS), or Theatre Arts (THA)

Choose 3 hours from any of the following: REL 1311, REL 1312, REL 1313, REL 1321, REL 1322

REL 1311 Introductory Studies in the Old Testament 3 hours Survey of Old Testament tradition, emphasizing its historical development and cultural setting, with writing assignments designed to enhance students’ appreciation of religious values.

REL 1312 Introductory Studies in the New Testament 3 hours Survey of New Testament tradition, emphasizing its historical development and cultural setting, with writing assignments designed to enhance students’ appreciation of religious values.

REL 1313 Introduction to Ethics 3 hours An examination of the traditions of moral thought, including an analysis of how traditional problems and processes are reflected in contemporary moral debates, with writing assignments designed to enhance students’ appreciation of ethical and moral values.

REL 1321 Introductory Studies in World Religions 3 hours A survey of selected world religions, emphasizing the diversity of religious experience in human life, with writing assignments designed to enhance students’ appreciation of religious values.

REL 1322 Ways of Being Religious 3 hours A comparative study of core beliefs, ideals and practices of varying religious traditions. The thematic focus of the course will be upon topics such as the nature of the divine, salvation, the nature of evil, morality and the experience of death.

Choose 3 hours from any of the following: Art (ART), Fine Arts (FAR), Music (MUS), or Theatre Arts (THA), HIS 2321, HIS 2301, HIS 2303, PHI 2301, PHI 2321, REL 1311, REL 1312, REL 1313, or REL 1321, SPC 1301

HIS 2301 World History to 1648 3 hours A survey of human experience to the seventeenth century with emphasis upon the growth of Western institutions and concepts.

HIS 2303 World History since 1648 3 hours This course is a continuation of the study of the rise and decline of the world’s major civilizations since 1500 with special emphasis on the colonization, industrialization, and ideological conflicts.

HIS 2321 Fundamentals of Early American History 3 hours This course will enable students to develop and demonstrate an adequate survey knowledge and understanding of American geography, politics, society, culture, economics, ideas, and beliefs from the colonial period to 1876.

PHI 2301 Logic 3 hours An introduction to the basic principles of logic.

PHI 2321 Introduction to Philosophy 3 hours A representative survey of the major divisions and characteristic problems of philosophy.

REL 1311 Introductory Studies in the Old Testament 3 hours Survey of Old Testament tradition, emphasizing its historical development and cultural setting, with writing assignments designed to enhance students’ appreciation of religious values.

REL 1312 Introductory Studies in the New Testament 3 hours Survey of New Testament tradition, emphasizing its historical development and cultural setting, with writing assignments designed to enhance students’ appreciation of religious values.

REL 1313 Introduction to Ethics 3 hours An examination of the traditions of moral thought, including an analysis of how traditional problems and processes are reflected in contemporary moral debates, with writing assignments designed to enhance students’ appreciation of ethical and moral values.

REL 1321 Introductory Studies in World Religions 3 hours A survey of selected world religions, emphasizing the diversity of religious experience in human life, with writing assignments designed to enhance students’ appreciation of religious values.

SPC 1301 Fundamentals of Speech 3 hours A beginning course in platform theory and practice designed to provide instruction in the essentials of effective public oral communication.

Social Literacy ....................................................................... 11 hours

EXS 1220 Basic Concepts of Wellness 2 hours Introduction of various methods for lifetime wellness, including workouts; some fitness, motor skills, and nutrition appraisal; lectures; discussions; and videos on important health information, with individualized counseling on each student's personal health and fitness needs.

Choose any 3 of the following courses with at least two different academic areas represented: BUA 1301, ECO 2305, FIN 1325, GEG 2304, GEG 2305, POL 2311, PSY 1301, PSY 2342, SOC 1302, SOC 2301, SOC 2302

BUA 1301 Introduction to Business 3 hours An overview of the historical and philosophical development of business as one of the most complex institutions in a pluralistic society. Included will be a study of the nature of business, the significant contributions of the field of business and its relationship to the social, political, and economic environment.

ECO 2305 Principles of Economics I 3 hours An introduction to macroeconomic analysis. The study of the economy as it functions as a whole, including all aggregate data affecting the income, employment, and price level of our economy.

FIN 1325 Personal Finance 3 hours This course offers an introduction to the planning and management of the financial status of an individual. Topics will include personal budgeting, car and home financing analysis, retirement planning, and a survey of investment opportunities.

GEG 2304 World Geography 3 hours This course consists of a survey of world regions and the geographic factors that shape them, including economic, political, linguistic, and religious variables as well as topography, climate, and natural resources. Global themes may include the impact of world population trends, environmental problems, trade and economic development, interactions between ethnic groups, and geopolitical change. Throughout the course, place-name location geography is emphasized.

GEG 2305 Human Geography 3 hours This topical survey course covers issues in cultural, urban, economic, and political geography. The course surveys these different branches of geography from the perspective of two interwoven themes: Fort Worth in a global context, and the impact of geography and geographic change in our lives.

POL 2311 American Government 3 hours A survey of the fundamental principles of American government with special emphasis on the Texas government and Constitution. This course satisfies the legislative requirements for teacher certification in Texas.

PSY 1301 General Psychology 3 hours A general introduction to the basic concepts of psychology.

PSY 2342 Psychology of Everyday Life 3 hours This course represents the application of psychological principles to everyday life, such as stress, interpersonal communication, relationships, gender roles, and careers.

SOC 1302 Cultural Anthropology 3 hours A survey of the science of humankind focusing on the world’s cultural diversity and the search for general explanatory theories that explain this diversity. The class will explore empirical methods to describe cultures and intracultural variation.

SOC 2301 Introduction to Sociology 3 hours A study of the nature of human societies, groups, social processes, social integration, and the sociological approach.

SOC 2302 Social Problems 3 hours An exploration of the development of societies, and the problems associated with population shifts to industrialized urban areas.

TOTAL ................................................................................................ 45-46 hours

While not part of the General Education Curriculum, ASE 1111, Freshman Seminar, is required for all first semester freshmen and freshman transfer students with 11 or fewer completed credit hours or conditionally admitted students. Students receive elective credit for this course.

ASE 1112, Freshman Seminar Laboratory, is a mandatory course for all freshman students placed on academic probation following their first semester.

Freshman Seminar

ASE 1111 Freshman Seminar 1 hour This course is designed to address issues related to the successful transition from high school to the University. Campus orientation, college level study skills, and other transitional issues are covered. A student may not drop ASE 1111. If a student fails to achieve a passing grade in ASE 1111, the student will be required to retake the course the following semester until a passing grade is achieved. Read more about the course.

Freshman Seminar Laboratory

ASE 1112 Freshman Seminar Laboratory 1 hour This class explores the various causes of academic probation and addresses strategies to regain adequate academic standing. Failure to enroll in ASE 1112 as required

Contact Information

Freshman Advising Office
EJW 203

Stacy Dissinger
Assistant Director
Phone: 817-531-5824
Email: sdissinger@txwes.edu
Hours: M-F 8-5

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