Secondary Certification

For information about the Texas Wesleyan program for Secondary Certification in History contact Dr. Elizabeth Alexander, assistant professor of history and coordinator of secondary education program in history, at 817-531-4920 or ealexander@txwes.edu.

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Degree Plans

Bachelor of Arts

General Education Curriculum: 45-46 hours

MAT 1302 or MAT 1304 is acceptable for the GEC math requirement.

Some courses listed in program “Major Requirements” or “Required Related Courses” (noted with an asterisk [*]) may be used to meet requirements in the GEC. Although these courses fulfill requirements in each area, credit hours for these courses, if taken for the GEC, may only be counted in the GEC.

Required Related Courses: 15-30 hours

English: 3 hours

ENG 3310. Advanced Writing 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 1301,1302, and 3 hours of sophomore literature, and 45 credit hours
Designed to build upon the sequence of outcomes emphasized in English 1301 and 1302, ENG 33XX is distinguished from first-year writing by the difficulty and length of writing projects ranging from resume and cover letter to extended research reports. English 33XX also offers more attention to style, grammar, and ethical documentation as writing strategies expected of upper-level students. Students will be encouraged to customize their assignments based on career goals and/or disciplinary conventions. They must also complete at least one formal oral presentation using presentation technologies and develop an online writing portfolio that could be used for internship, career, or graduate school applications.

Foreign Language: 12 hours

May be met with 12 hours of one language or 6 hours each of two languages

Geography: 0-6 hours

GEG 2304. World Geography* 3 hours
This course consists of a survey of world regions and the geographic factors that shape them, including economic, political, linguistic, and religious variables as well as topography, climate, and natural resources. Global themes may include the impact of world population trends, environmental problems, trade and economic development, interactions between ethnic groups, and geopolitical change. Throughout the course, place-name location geography is emphasized.

GEG 2305. Human Geography* 3 hours
This topical survey course covers issues in cultural, urban, economic, and political geography. The course surveys these different branches of geography from the perspective of two interwoven themes: Fort Worth in a global context, and the impact of geography and geographic change in our lives.

History: 0-6 hours

HIS 2321. Fundamentals of Early American History* 3 hours
This course will enable students to develop and demonstrate an adequate survey knowledge and understanding of American geography, politics, society, culture, economics, ideas, and beliefs from the colonial period to 1876.

HIS 2322. Fundamentals of Modern American History, 1877 to Present * 3 hours
This course will enable students to develop and demonstrate an adequate survey knowledge and understanding of American geography, politics, society, culture, economics, ideas, and beliefs from 1876 to the present.

If a student transfers with an AA degree or Texas Core Complete and has not taken HIS 2322, she/he must take it for certification.

Political Science: 0-3 hours

POL 2311. American Government I* 3 hours
A survey of the fundamental principles of American government with special emphasis on the Texas government and Constitution. This course satisfies the legislative requirements for teacher certification in Texas.

Major Requirements: 37-43 hours

All history courses in the major must be passed with a grade of “C” or above. All history majors must enroll in at least 9 hours of research classes. Research classes are designated in the catalog description with an “R” after the course number. Upon obtaining 90 hours, certification students are required to enroll in HIS 4152, History Content Review, until passed successfully. Passing this course requires the student to pass the TExES Practice Exam with a score of 75%. This permits the student to request a bar code from the School of Education enabling her/him to sit for the TExES Content Exam.

History: 37-43 hours

HIS 2301. World History to 1648 (3301)* 3 hours
A survey of human experience to the seventeenth century with emphasis upon the growth of Western institutions and concepts.

HIS 2303. World History since 1648 * 3 hours
This course is a continuation of the study of the rise and decline of the world’s major civilizations since 1500 with special emphasis on the colonization, industrialization, and ideological conflicts.

HIS 3380. Workshop in Historical Methods 3 hours
Designed as a workshop in historical methods for history majors, this course will guide students through the research process. Students will gain knowledge in and apply the Turabian documentation style (Chicago Manual Style) and learn the uses of informational technology in history. The use of oral history and its methods will be explored.

HIS 4152. History Content Review 1 hour
This course is a one-credit course that must be passed before a student can obtain a bar code from the School of Education to take the TExES History Content Area Exam.

HIS 4330. Methods and Strategies for Teaching History and Social Studies at the Secondary Level 3 hours
This course is designed to introduce students to the methods and strategies of teaching history and social studies at the secondary level. This course will focus on several topics and themes of importance to practicing teachers, including recent debates about the teaching of American, European, and World History; creating active learning opportunities based on primary sources; the utility of lecturing; methods of historical inquiry; teaching writing while teaching history; curriculum development aligned with state standards; using technology in the social studies classroom; incorporation of local history; and assignment design and evaluation.

HIS 4390. Historiography 3 hours
This course explores major trends in historiography, tracing the major interpretations from the ancient to the modern world. The course examines the current focus on micro over macro history, the attack of postmodernism on historical research, and the struggles to incorporate “those on the margins” into the story of humanity.

Take the following:

HIS 3322. History of Texas 3 hours
A study of the political, economic, and social growth of Texas from the Spanish origin to the present.

HIS 3345R. Colonial and Revolutionary America 3 hours
This course will examine the history of North American colonies that in 1788 became the United States of America. On a comparative basis, we will also look at Spanish, French, and British Caribbean colonial experience. Course readings and class time will give special attention to the genre of cultural history, and to the topics of family and gender, slavery, and revolution. Three themes will be important to our study: 1) cultural encounters, 2) colonialism and empire and, 3) nationalism and national identity.

Choose one:

3346R. From Union to Disunion: The United States Between 1787-1865 3 hours
This course will be divided into two parts. Part One will address the creation of government of the United States after the adoption of the Constitution. Part Two will discuss the American Civil War as a defining moment in American history.

4362R. History of the Old South 3 hours
This course examines the history of the Old South from 1600 to beginning of the Civil War, but focusing on the period from 1800 to 1861. The lectures and readings cover a variety of topics, including myths and facts about southern society and culture, slavery and the strengthening of southern distinctiveness, and political events that eventually led to the creation of a separate (short-lived) southern nation in 1861.

Choose one:

3347R. Industrialization and Imperialism in Post-Civil War America: 1865-1920 3 hours
The industrial age of the late 19th century brought considerable changes to American culture and society. In this course, students will study the major events, issues, organizations, and personalities that emerged during this period of American history.

4372R. History of the New South 3 hours
This course will focus on the changes in the social fabric, politics, and economy of the American South and Southwest (The Sunbelt) since the Civil War with an emphasis on civil rights, labor issues, rural-urban transition, agriculture and manufacturing, defense industry, and ethnic groups.

Choose one:

3348R. The United States as a World Power: 1920 - Present 3 hours
This course provides an in-depth look at recent United States history from the end of the First World War through the Clinton years, concentrating on the major themes and events of the twentieth century, when the United States became the world’s dominant economic and military power. The impact of this global reach on the peoples of the United States is the major concern of the course.

4310. The Great Depression: History through Writings, Film, and Literature 3 hours
This course will focus on the changes in the social fabric, politics, and economy of the United States during the years preceding and following the Great Depression through historical writings, film, and literature.

4311. World War II 3 hours
A history of the origins, events, and outcomes of World War II through primary documents, texts, internet research, movies, discussion, and lectures. Topics include the Versailles Treaty, the international relations of the 1920’s, the Weimar government and the Nazi takeover, the major battles, the winning of the war, and the emergence of the Cold War.

Choose one of the following seminar courses:

HIS 3361. Women in the Western World Since 1500 3 hours
This course will survey the main themes in women's history since 1500, concentrating on the experiences of European and American women of all social classes. Work, sexuality, family, gender, and politics will be examined within three chronological periods: the Early Modern World, the Liberal and Industrial West, and the twentieth century.

HIS 3362R. Women and Reform 3 hours
This course will explore the participation of women in reform movements, concentrating on individual and collective leadership of women in individual rights, legal entitlement, suffrage, social issues (such as temperance), reproduction, and health care.

4326. Heroes in History 3 hours
The course surveys the human desire to raise up heroes and villains from prehistory to the present using historical, sociological, anthropological and film sources.

4338. Development of British and American Democracy 3 hours
This course is an intensive study of the development of democratic institutions in the two best-known examples of working democracies. The course will compare the parliamentary and presidential governmental systems and emphasize the development of representative government, constitutional theory, growth of the common law, and expansion of suffrage.

4363R. Race and Gender in American History 3 hours
This course is intended to introduce students to recent historical work on race, class, and gender in the context of United States history. Central to this course is the understanding that these “social categories” are the products of history, not stable, unchanging “facts.” This makes studying their historical development particularly important to understanding their current manifestation. Equally important is the recognition that membership in these categories has historically shaped the extent to which individuals

  • Any 6 hours of non-US History 
  • Any 3 hours of Latin American History

Education Requirements: 26 hours

To enter the education certification program a student must attain a 2.5 cumulative GPA. A Texas Wesleyan student with the required average will be allowed to begin education courses in the fall of her/his sophomore year; transfer students who have completed 45 hours with the required average will be allowed to begin education classes during her/his first semester at Texas Wesleyan.

Professional Development: 9 hours

EDU 2300. Foundations of Education 3 hours
Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA
An introduction to teaching, to the Texas Wesleyan University teacher education program and Texas certification standards. Designed to enhance the student’s educational understanding and critical thinking. Students will explore links among historical foundations and best practice, learning theorist, and contemporary concerns in education. Ten fieldwork hours are required. This course is a prerequisite for the professional development core and methodology courses.

EDU 3308. Teaching the Exceptional Child 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDU 2300 and admission to Teacher Education
An introductory study of the various exceptionalities. EDU 3308 requires 10 hours of field experience in addition to class time.

EDU 3310. Studies in Multicultural Education 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDU 2300 and admission to Teacher Education
This course address the attitudes, knowledge, and skills necessary for working with culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse students and their families, especially as it relates to the role of the classroom teacher in providing appropriate cultural experiences, environments, and curriculum for students. The course is based on the application of family-centered practices, including preservation of the home language. The format of the class will provide opportunities for and critical reflection and participation in active learning processes such as role playing, small group discussion, and problem solving with culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse family situations and instructional dilemmas.

6-12 Pedagogy: 8 hours

EDU 3432. Instruction, Assessment and Classroom Management in the Secondary School 4 hours
Prerequisite: EDU 2300 and admission to Teacher Education
Principles of instruction, assessment and classroom management are explored in the context of conceptual development. Includes how to organize and manage a successful learning environment. The course assists teacher candidates develop an individual classroom management and instructional plan appropriate to their proposed teaching field. In addition to class time, ten hours of Observation and ten hours of Field Experience within context of a public or private school are required. This course requires 20 observation hours.

EDU 4110. Pedagogy and Professional Development Laboratory 1 hour
Prerequisite: EDU 2300, 3431, admission to Teacher Education, and senior standing
Provides review of professional development TExES exam. Student must achieve mastery of the material to satisfactorily complete the course. This course is a prerequisite for student teaching.

EDU 4331. Differentiating Instruction in Mixed-Ability K-12 Classrooms 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDU 2300, 3431, 3308 and admission to Teacher Education
This course will provide students with research-based resources, strategies, and technology for working with students of all abilities in the regular classroom. Students will examine the role of the classroom teacher in differentiating instruction for special education, average-ability, and gifted students in the content areas.

Reading: 3 hours

RDG 4347. Reading in the Content Area 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDU 2300, 3432, and admission to Teacher Education
A course to assist teachers and prospective teachers in becoming aware of and sensitive to reading in content classrooms. Focus is on both diagnostic and instructional techniques in content area instruction. Laboratory required.

Student Teaching: 6 hours

EDU 4604. Student Teaching in the Secondary School 6 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and Consent of Teacher Education Committee, Successful passing of Wesleyan TExES pretests for Generalist and PPR.
The secondary student teaching experience is the culmination and application of all educational coursework at Texas Wesleyan University. Students are required to demonstrate a thorough understanding of best practice strategies for the secondary classroom. The course consists of two classroom assignments over a fourteen week period. Students must participate in all aspects of the public school system during this course. This will include instruction, assessment, classroom management, and professional communications in a public school setting. Students must apply for student teaching a semester prior to taking the course, pass all required practice certification exams, successfully complete any and all improvement plans arising from any fitness to teach report.

Total Hours: 129-145 hours

Bachelor of Science

General Education Curriculum: 45-46 hours

MAT 1302 or MAT 1304 is acceptable for the GEC math requirement.

Some courses listed in program “Major Requirements” or “Required Related Courses” (noted with an asterisk [*]) may be used to meet requirements in the GEC. Although these courses fulfill requirements in each area, credit hours for these courses, if taken for the GEC, may only be counted in the GEC.

Required Related Courses: 3-18 hours

English: 3 hours

ENG 3310. Advanced Writing 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 1301,1302, and 3 hours of sophomore literature, and 45 credit hours
Designed to build upon the sequence of outcomes emphasized in English 1301 and 1302, ENG 33XX is distinguished from first-year writing by the difficulty and length of writing projects ranging from resume and cover letter to extended research reports. English 33XX also offers more attention to style, grammar, and ethical documentation as writing strategies expected of upper-level students. Students will be encouraged to customize their assignments based on career goals and/or disciplinary conventions. They must also complete at least one formal oral presentation using presentation technologies and develop an online writing portfolio that could be used for internship, career, or graduate school applications.

Geography: 0-6 hours

GEG 2304. World Geography* 3 hours
This course consists of a survey of world regions and the geographic factors that shape them, including economic, political, linguistic, and religious variables as well as topography, climate, and natural resources. Global themes may include the impact of world population trends, environmental problems, trade and economic development, interactions between ethnic groups, and geopolitical change. Throughout the course, place-name location geography is emphasized.

GEG 2305. Human Geography* 3 hours
This topical survey course covers issues in cultural, urban, economic, and political geography. The course surveys these different branches of geography from the perspective of two interwoven themes: Fort Worth in a global context, and the impact of geography and geographic change in our lives.

History: 0-6 hours

HIS 2321. Fundamentals of Early American History* 3 hours
This course will enable students to develop and demonstrate an adequate survey knowledge and understanding of American geography, politics, society, culture, economics, ideas, and beliefs from the colonial period to 1876.

HIS 2322. Fundamentals of Modern American History, 1877 to Present * 3 hours
This course will enable students to develop and demonstrate an adequate survey knowledge and understanding of American geography, politics, society, culture, economics, ideas, and beliefs from 1876 to the present.

If a student transfers with an AA degree or Texas Core Complete and has not taken HIS 2322, she/he must take it for certification.

Political Science: 0-3 hours

POL 2311. American Government I* 3 hours
A survey of the fundamental principles of American government with special emphasis on the Texas government and Constitution. This course satisfies the legislative requirements for teacher certification in Texas.

Major Requirements: 37-43 hours

All history courses in the major must be passed with a grade of “C” or above. All history majors must enroll in at least 9 hours of research classes. Research classes are designated in the catalog description with an “R” after the course number. Upon obtaining 90 hours, certification students are required to enroll in HIS 4152, History Content Review, until passed successfully. Passing this course requires the student to pass the TExES Practice Exam with a score of 80%. This permits the student to request a bar code from the School of Education enabling her/him to sit for the TExES Content Exam.

History: 37-43 hours

HIS 2301. World History to 1648 (3301)* 3 hours
A survey of human experience to the seventeenth century with emphasis upon the growth of Western institutions and concepts.

HIS 2303. World History since 1648 * 3 hours
This course is a continuation of the study of the rise and decline of the world’s major civilizations since 1500 with special emphasis on the colonization, industrialization, and ideological conflicts.

HIS 3380. Workshop in Historical Methods 3 hours
Designed as a workshop in historical methods for history majors, this course will guide students through the research process. Students will gain knowledge in and apply the Turabian documentation style (Chicago Manual Style) and learn the uses of informational technology in history. The use of oral history and its methods will be explored.

HIS 4152. History Content Review 1 hour
This course is a one-credit course that must be passed before a student can obtain a bar code from the School of Education to take the TExES History Content Area Exam.

HIS 4330. Methods and Strategies for Teaching History and Social Studies at the Secondary Level 3 hours
This course is designed to introduce students to the methods and strategies of teaching history and social studies at the secondary level. This course will focus on several topics and themes of importance to practicing teachers, including recent debates about the teaching of American, European, and World History; creating active learning opportunities based on primary sources; the utility of lecturing; methods of historical inquiry; teaching writing while teaching history; curriculum development aligned with state standards; using technology in the social studies classroom; incorporation of local history; and assignment design and evaluation.

HIS 4390. Historiography 3 hours
This course explores major trends in historiography, tracing the major interpretations from the ancient to the modern world. The course examines the current focus on micro over macro history, the attack of postmodernism on historical research, and the struggles to incorporate “those on the margins” into the story of humanity.

Take the following:

HIS 3322. History of Texas 3 hours
A study of the political, economic, and social growth of Texas from the Spanish origin to the present.

HIS 3345R. Colonial and Revolutionary America 3 hours
This course will examine the history of North American colonies that in 1788 became the United States of America. On a comparative basis, we will also look at Spanish, French, and British Caribbean colonial experience. Course readings and class time will give special attention to the genre of cultural history, and to the topics of family and gender, slavery, and revolution. Three themes will be important to our study: 1) cultural encounters, 2) colonialism and empire and, 3) nationalism and national identity.

Choose one:

3346R. From Union to Disunion: The United States Between 1787-1865 3 hours
This course will be divided into two parts. Part One will address the creation of government of the United States after the adoption of the Constitution. Part Two will discuss the American Civil War as a defining moment in American history.

4362R. History of the Old South 3 hours
This course examines the history of the Old South from 1600 to beginning of the Civil War, but focusing on the period from 1800 to 1861. The lectures and readings cover a variety of topics, including myths and facts about southern society and culture, slavery and the strengthening of southern distinctiveness, and political events that eventually led to the creation of a separate (short-lived) southern nation in 1861.

Choose one:

3347R. Industrialization and Imperialism in Post-Civil War America: 1865-1920 3 hours
The industrial age of the late 19th century brought considerable changes to American culture and society. In this course, students will study the major events, issues, organizations, and personalities that emerged during this period of American history.

4372R. History of the New South 3 hours
This course will focus on the changes in the social fabric, politics, and economy of the American South and Southwest (The Sunbelt) since the Civil War with an emphasis on civil rights, labor issues, rural-urban transition, agriculture and manufacturing, defense industry, and ethnic groups.

Choose one:

3348R. The United States as a World Power: 1920 - Present 3 hours
This course provides an in-depth look at recent United States history from the end of the First World War through the Clinton years, concentrating on the major themes and events of the twentieth century, when the United States became the world’s dominant economic and military power. The impact of this global reach on the peoples of the United States is the major concern of the course.

4310. The Great Depression: History through Writings, Film, and Literature 3 hours
This course will focus on the changes in the social fabric, politics, and economy of the United States during the years preceding and following the Great Depression through historical writings, film, and literature.

4311. World War II 3 hours
A history of the origins, events, and outcomes of World War II through primary documents, texts, internet research, movies, discussion, and lectures. Topics include the Versailles Treaty, the international relations of the 1920’s, the Weimar government and the Nazi takeover, the major battles, the winning of the war, and the emergence of the Cold War.

Choose one of the following seminar courses:

HIS 3361. Women in the Western World Since 1500 3 hours
This course will survey the main themes in women's history since 1500, concentrating on the experiences of European and American women of all social classes. Work, sexuality, family, gender, and politics will be examined within three chronological periods: the Early Modern World, the Liberal and Industrial West, and the twentieth century.

HIS 3362R. Women and Reform 3 hours
This course will explore the participation of women in reform movements, concentrating on individual and collective leadership of women in individual rights, legal entitlement, suffrage, social issues (such as temperance), reproduction, and health care.

4326. Heroes in History 3 hours
The course surveys the human desire to raise up heroes and villains from prehistory to the present using historical, sociological, anthropological and film sources.

4338. Development of British and American Democracy 3 hours
This course is an intensive study of the development of democratic institutions in the two best-known examples of working democracies. The course will compare the parliamentary and presidential governmental systems and emphasize the development of representative government, constitutional theory, growth of the common law, and expansion of suffrage.

4363R. Race and Gender in American History 3 hours
This course is intended to introduce students to recent historical work on race, class, and gender in the context of United States history. Central to this course is the understanding that these “social categories” are the products of history, not stable, unchanging “facts.” This makes studying their historical development particularly important to understanding their current manifestation. Equally important is the recognition that membership in these categories has historically shaped the extent to which individuals

  • Any 6 hours of non-US History 
  • Any 3 hours of Latin American History

Education Requirements: 26 hours

To enter the education certification program a student must attain a 2.5 cumulative GPA. A Texas Wesleyan student with the required average will be allowed to begin education courses in the fall of her/his sophomore year; transfer students who have completed 45 hours with the required average will be allowed to begin education classes during her/his first semester at Texas Wesleyan.

Professional Development: 9 hours

EDU 2300. Foundations of Education 3 hours
Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA
An introduction to teaching, to the Texas Wesleyan University teacher education program and Texas certification standards. Designed to enhance the student’s educational understanding and critical thinking. Students will explore links among historical foundations and best practice, learning theorist, and contemporary concerns in education. Ten fieldwork hours are required. This course is a prerequisite for the professional development core and methodology courses.

EDU 3308. Teaching the Exceptional Child 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDU 2300 and admission to Teacher Education
An introductory study of the various exceptionalities. EDU 3308 requires 10 hours of field experience in addition to class time.

EDU 3310. Studies in Multicultural Education 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDU 2300 and admission to Teacher Education
This course address the attitudes, knowledge, and skills necessary for working with culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse students and their families, especially as it relates to the role of the classroom teacher in providing appropriate cultural experiences, environments, and curriculum for students. The course is based on the application of family-centered practices, including preservation of the home language. The format of the class will provide opportunities for and critical reflection and participation in active learning processes such as role playing, small group discussion, and problem solving with culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse family situations and instructional dilemmas.

6-12 Pedagogy: 8 hours

EDU 3432. Instruction, Assessment and Classroom Management in the Secondary School 4 hours
Prerequisite: EDU 2300 and admission to Teacher Education
Principles of instruction, assessment and classroom management are explored in the context of conceptual development. Includes how to organize and manage a successful learning environment. The course assists teacher candidates develop an individual classroom management and instructional plan appropriate to their proposed teaching field. In addition to class time, ten hours of Observation and ten hours of Field Experience within context of a public or private school are required. This course requires 20 observation hours.

EDU 4110. Pedagogy and Professional Development Laboratory 1 hour
Prerequisite: EDU 2300, 3431, admission to Teacher Education, and senior standing
Provides review of professional development TExES exam. Student must achieve mastery of the material to satisfactorily complete the course. This course is a prerequisite for student teaching.

EDU 4331. Differentiating Instruction in Mixed-Ability K-12 Classrooms 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDU 2300, 3431, 3308 and admission to Teacher Education
This course will provide students with research-based resources, strategies, and technology for working with students of all abilities in the regular classroom. Students will examine the role of the classroom teacher in differentiating instruction for special education, average-ability, and gifted students in the content areas.

Reading: 3 hours

RDG 4347. Reading in the Content Area 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDU 2300, 3432, and admission to Teacher Education
A course to assist teachers and prospective teachers in becoming aware of and sensitive to reading in content classrooms. Focus is on both diagnostic and instructional techniques in content area instruction. Laboratory required.

Student Teaching: 6 hours

EDU 4604. Student Teaching in the Secondary School 6 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and Consent of Teacher Education Committee, Successful passing of Wesleyan TExES pretests for Generalist and PPR.
The secondary student teaching experience is the culmination and application of all educational coursework at Texas Wesleyan University. Students are required to demonstrate a thorough understanding of best practice strategies for the secondary classroom. The course consists of two classroom assignments over a fourteen week period. Students must participate in all aspects of the public school system during this course. This will include instruction, assessment, classroom management, and professional communications in a public school setting. Students must apply for student teaching a semester prior to taking the course, pass all required practice certification exams, successfully complete any and all improvement plans arising from any fitness to teach report.

Electives: 0-7 hours

Total Hours: 124-133 hours

Contact Information

Department of Social Sciences 
Location: Polytechnic United Methodist Church 217 
Phone: 817-531-4918 
Fax: 817-531-4202 
Hours: Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm

 

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