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Documentation Guidelines

Documentation guidelines

Documentation guidelines outline the specific information that must be included on reports or evaluations that the student may submit to Disability Accommodations in order to register for services. Specific information is available according to the type of disability. Please make sure to reference the set of guidelines that most closely match the student’s disability.

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Students seeking support services from Disability Accommodations (DA) on the basis of a previously diagnosed Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) must submit documentation that verifies their eligibility under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act. The documentation must describe a disabling condition, which is defined by the presence of substantial limitations in one or more major life activities. Merely submitting evidence of a diagnosis, and/or a discrepancy between ability and achievement on the basis of a single subtest score is not sufficient to warrant academic accommodations. Similarly, nonspecific diagnoses, such as individual “learning styles,” “learning differences,” “academic problems,” “attention problems” and “test difficulty/anxiety” in and of themselves, do not constitute a disability.

The guidelines below are intended to provide guidance for the assessment process, including the areas that must be assessed in order for DA staff to make appropriate decisions. Examples of specific tests that may be used within each area are available upon request. A verification form is also available to provide guidance in the assessment process.

While it is recognized that psychological testing alone does not justify an ADHD diagnosis, such testing is considered an important part of establishing the impact of the disorder on learning and determining appropriate accommodations. It is also essential in determining the presence or absence of other conditions that frequently co-occur with the disorder, which may be of relevance in the classroom. Comprehensive psychoeducational or neuropsychological evaluations may be required to support specific accommodation requests. Evaluators should not be related to the individual being assessed. At a minimum, all documentation in support of an ADHD should include the following information:

1. DSM-V or ICD Diagnosis (text and code) and information concerning comorbidity

a. Date of diagnosis

b. Date of last contact: The assessment must be current. Accommodations are based on an assessment of the current nature and impact of your disability. Evaluations must have been completed within the last three (3) years prior to accommodation requests. In addition, depending on the nature of the disability, evaluations may need to be updated on a semester-by-semester or yearly basis.

2. Evaluation: a list of questionnaires, interviews and observations used to identify the AD/HD. A summary should include information regarding the onset, longevity and severity of the symptoms as well as treatment history including medication.

3. Functional Limitations: should be determined without consideration of mitigating measures (i.e. medication, etc.). If condition is episodic in nature, level of functioning should be assessed based on active phase of symptoms:

a. Major life activities that are functionally limited by the individual’s symptoms.

b/c. Behavioral manifestations of the diagnosis that functionally limits the individual in the academic setting. Information to consider includes the severity pervasiveness, and frequency of symptoms.

d. Any special considerations that should be made (i.e. side effects of medication, etc.)

4. Accommodations: history of accommodations. (Optional) Suggested recommendations, modifications and/or accommodations.

It is important to recognize that accommodation needs can change over time and are not always identified during the initial diagnostic process. A prior history of accommodation, without demonstration of current need, does not in and of itself warrant provision of a like accommodation.

DA will make the final determination as to whether appropriate and reasonable accommodations are warranted and can be provided to the individual.

In addition to documentation as described above, transfer students should provide written verification of accommodations received (and dates served) from the previously attended school(s).

The diagnostic report, must include the name and title, and license number of the evaluator. A verification form is available to assist in the documentation process.

All documentation submitted to Disability Accommodations Department is considered confidential.

Documentation should be turned in at the Disability Accommodations Office.

 

Sexual Misconduct/Sexual Discrimination

Disability Accommodation employees are designated “responsible employees”. A responsible employee is a university employee who has the duty to report incidents of sexual misconduct to the Title IX Office (or designee), or an employee whom an individual could reasonably believe has this authority or duty. Sexual misconduct includes sex and gender discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating and domestic violence, stalking, sexual exploitation and any other forms of inappropriate sexual conduct. Information related to incidents of sexual misconduct that is disclosed in documentation may be reported to the Title IX Office. Disability/diagnostic information will be kept in accordance with DA’s confidentiality guidelines.

Confidential resources are people who are not obligated to share any personally identifying information about a report of sexual violence (such as the survivor or accused’s name) with law enforcement, the Title IX Coordinator or any other university administrator.

The confidential resources for Texas Wesleyan University are the following individuals:

Anice Lewis-Hollins
Director of Health Service
817-531-4948

Scott Methvin
Counseling Center Director/Counselor
817-531-4859

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Students seeking support services from Disability Accommodations (DA) on the basis of a previously diagnosed Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) must submit documentation that verifies their eligibility under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act. The documentation must describe a disabling condition, which is defined by the presence of substantial limitations in one or more major life activities. Merely submitting evidence of a diagnosis is not sufficient to warrant academic accommodations. Similarly, nonspecific diagnoses, such as “adjustment problems,” “emotional difficulties,” “poor communication,” and/or “test difficulty/anxiety” in and of themselves do not constitute a disability. The guidelines below are intended to allow DA to determine eligibility for services and appropriate accommodations. A comprehensive report of any testing conducted (including test scores, if relevant) should be included with the verification form.

1. DSM-5 or ICD Diagnosis (text and code), given based on a formal assessment of current psychological and health status, and a formal diagnosis of a disabling condition provided by a licensed treatment provider (e.g., psychiatrist, licensed clinical psychologist, licensed social worker, etc.). Licensed treatment provider should not be related to the individual being assessed.

In order to establish a history of the condition and recency of evaluation.

a. Date of diagnosis.

b. Date of last contact. The assessment must be current. Accommodations are based on an assessment of the current nature and impact of your disability. Evaluations must have been completed within the last three (3) years prior to accommodation requests. In addition, depending on the nature of the disability, evaluations may need to be updated on a semester-by-semester or yearly basis.

2. Comprehensive Evaluation

a. A diagnostic interview and other tools used to determine relevant background in support of that diagnosis.

b. The evaluation should include treatments (e.g., medication, therapy) currently in use and provide a description of the expected progression of the disability over time (i.e., permanent/chronic vs. short-term/temporary). Information on medication side effects is useful and may be considered in accommodation decisions.

c. Onset, history and prognosis of diagnosis and symptoms.

3. Functional limitations: should be determined without consideration of mitigating measures (i.e. medication, etc.). If condition is episodic in nature, level of functioning should be assessed based on active phase of symptoms

a. Major life activities that are functionally limited by the individual’s symptoms.

b/c. Behavioral manifestations of the diagnosis that functionally limits the individual in the academic setting. Information to consider includes the severity pervasiveness, and frequency of symptoms.

d. Any special considerations that should be made (i.e. side effects of medication, etc.)

4. Accommodations: a description of accommodations and services used in the past and recommended accommodations for the future. It is important to note that Disability Accommodations staff makes the determination regarding what accommodations are appropriate in the university environment.

It is important to recognize that accommodation needs can change over time and are not always identified during the initial diagnostic process. A prior history of accommodation, without demonstration of current need, does not in and of itself warrant provision of a like accommodation.

DA will make the final determination as to whether appropriate and reasonable accommodations are warranted and can be provided to the individual.

In addition to documentation as described above, transfer students should provide written verification of accommodations received (and dates served) from the previously attended school(s).

The diagnostic report must include the name and title, and license number of the evaluator. A verification form is available to assist in the documentation process.

All documentation submitted to Disability Accommodations Department is considered confidential.

Documentation should be turned in at the Disability Accommodations Office.

 

 

Blind and Low Vision

Students seeking support services from Disability Accommodations (DA) on the basis of a visual disability must submit documentation that verifies their eligibility under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act. The documentation must describe a disabling condition, which is defined by the presence of significant limitations in one or more major life activities. Merely submitting evidence of a diagnosis is not sufficient to warrant academic accommodations. Documentation from a recognized agency as being eligible for services, for example the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC), Division of Blind Services may be considered, but specific accommodation requests may require the documentation outlined below

An ophthalmologist, optometrist or other qualified professional should make the diagnosis and complete the appropriate documentation. The diagnostician should not be a family member of the student. A verification form is also available to provide guidance in the assessment process. Documentation should include:

1. Diagnosis: statement of vision-related disability with supporting numerical description including visual acuity with and without correction.

a. Onset of diagnosis

b. Date of last clinical contact

2. Evaluation: the age of acceptable documentation is dependent upon the nature of the condition and the student’s request for accommodations; however, documentation that reflects the current impact on the student’s functioning should be submitted. Visual disabilities of a changing nature may need to be documented more frequently.

a. Assessment procedures and evaluation instruments or tools used to determine diagnosis

b. Narrative summary of assessment results

c. Present symptoms that meet criteria for the diagnosis

d. Current treatment being received

e. Severity of symptoms

f. Prognosis of disorder

3. Functional Limitation

a. Impact on major life activities

b. Behavioral manifestation of the disability, in particular regarding the way it impacts the student in the learning context for which the accommodations are being requested.

c. Any additional limitations that fall in the substantial range.

d. Special considerations (e.g. medication side effects, etc.)

4.  Accommodations

a. History of accommodations

b. (Optional) Recommended accommodations

c. (Optional) Additional information that may be helpful in determining accommodations

Further assessment by an appropriate professional may be required if co-existing learning disabilities or other disabling conditions are indicated.

All documentation must be submitted on the official letterhead of the professional describing the disability. The report should be dated and signed and include the name, title and professional credentials of the evaluator, including information about license/certification. A Disability Accommodations staff member will make the determination regarding whether accommodations are reasonable in the University environment.

The diagnostic report, must include the name and title, and license number of the evaluator. A verification form is available to assist in the documentation process.

All documentation submitted to Disability Accommodations Department is considered confidential.

Documentation should be turned in at the Disability Accommodations Office.

 

 

Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Students seeking support services from Disability Accommodations (DA) on the basis of a previously diagnosed hearing loss must submit documentation that verifies their eligibility under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act. The documentation must describe a disabling condition, which is defined by the presence of significant limitations in one or more major life activities. Merely submitting evidence of a diagnosis is not sufficient to warrant academic accommodations. If submitting a Certification of Deafness from the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Division (DHHS), in the Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), please include the documentation used to qualify for the certification.

An audiologist, speech and hearing specialist or other qualified professional should make the diagnosis. The diagnostician should not be a family member of the student. Documentation should include:

  • A clear statement of deafness or any degree of hearing loss with a current audiogram is required. The age of acceptable documentation is dependent upon the condition and the nature of the student’s request for accommodations. It should also note the status of the individual’s hearing (static or changing). Hearing loss of a changing nature may need to be documented more frequently.
  • A narrative summary of assessment procedures that was used to make the diagnosis, evaluation results, and list any recommended accommodations.

Further assessment by an appropriate professional may be required if co-existing learning disabilities or other disabling conditions are indicated.

All documentation must be submitted on the official letterhead of the professional describing the disability. The report should be dated and signed and include the name, title and professional credentials of the evaluator, including information about license/certification. A Disability Accommodations staff member will make the determination regarding whether accommodations are reasonable in the University environment.

The diagnostic report, must include the name and title, and license number of the evaluator. A verification form is available to assist in the documentation process.

All documentation submitted to Disability Accommodations Department is considered confidential.

Documentation should be turned in at the Disability Accommodations Office.

 

 

Learning Disabilities (LD)

Students seeking support services from Disability Accommodations (AD) on the basis of a previously diagnosed learning disorder (LD) must submit documentation that verifies their eligibility under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act. The documentation must describe a disabling condition, which is defined by the presence of significant limitations in one or more major life activities. Merely submitting evidence of a diagnosis, and/or a discrepancy between ability and achievement on the basis of a single subtest score is not sufficient to warrant academic accommodations. Similarly, nonspecific diagnoses, such as individual “learning styles,” “learning differences,” “academic problems” and “test difficulty/anxiety” in and of themselves do not constitute a disability. The guidelines below are intended to provide guidance for the assessment process, including the areas that must be assessed in order for DA staff to make appropriate decisions

Students submitting documentation of a learning disorder must provide a copy of the comprehensive psychoeducational report in order for the student to be eligible for accommodations and/or modifications. Such documentation should include:

1. DSM-V or ICD Diagnosis (text and code) and information concerning comorbidity.

  • There must be clear and specific evidence of a learning disability.
  • Testing should be current. Accommodations are based on the current nature and impact of your disability. In general, this means that testing must have been conducted within the last five (5) years prior to your request for accommodations.

2. Evaluation: testing must be comprehensive. Objective evidence of a substantial limitation in cognition and learning must be provided. Minimally, the domains to be addressed must include, but are not limited to:

  • A diagnostic interview – include relevant background information in support of the diagnosis. This may include a self-report of limitations and difficulties, a history of the presenting problem(s), a developmental history, academic history, including summaries of previous evaluation results and reports of classroom behavior and performance, a history of the family’s learning difficulties and primary language spoken in the home, any pertinent medical and psychological history and a discussion of possible comorbid conditions.
  • A complete psychoeducational or neuropsychological evaluation – actual test scores must be provided; standard scores are preferred. It is not acceptable to administer only one test or to base the diagnosis on only one of several subtests. Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) in and of themselves are not sufficient documentation. The assessment instruments used must be reliable, valid, and standardized for diagnosing LD in an adult population. The following areas are generally assessed:
    • Aptitude – intellectual assessments
    • Achievement – current levels of academic functioning in relevant areas such as reading, mathematics, oral and written language
    • Information Processing – specific areas of information processing (e.g. short and long-term memory, sequential memory, auditory and visual perception/processing, processing speed, executive functioning, motor ability).

3.   Functional Limitations: the testing report should clearly detail how the individual’s disabling condition affects a major life activity and the resultant functional limitations in the academic setting. This may include information on the severity and pervasiveness of the disorder. The evaluator should also specify how the test results relate to the individual’s functioning.

Functional limitations should be determined WITHOUT consideration of mitigating measures (i.e. medication, etc.).  If condition is episodic in nature, level of functioning should be assessed based on active phase of symptoms.

4. Accommodations: the documentation should include a history of current and past accommodations and whether or not they were useful. Recommendations for future accommodations and services are helpful and should be included. However, the determination of whether an accommodation is reasonable and appropriate within the University environment rests with DA. The diagnostic report must be on letterhead, typed, dated, signed, and otherwise legible. The name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator, including information about license or certification as well as area of specialization, employment and state in which the individual practices, must be clearly stated. Use of diagnostic terminology indicating a specific disability by someone whose training and experience are not in these fields is not acceptable. Evaluators should not be related to the individual being assessed. Diagnoses written on prescription pads and/or parent’s notes indicating a disability are NOT considered appropriate documentation.

It is important to recognize that accommodation needs can change over time and are not always identified during the initial diagnostic process. A prior history of accommodation, without demonstration of current need, does not in and of itself warrant provision of a like accommodation. DA will make the final determination as to whether appropriate and reasonable accommodations are warranted and can be provided to the individual. In addition to documentation as described above, transfer students should provide written verification of accommodations received (and dates served) from the previously attended school(s).

The diagnostic report, must include the name and title, and license number of the evaluator. A verification form is available to assist in the documentation process.

All documentation submitted to Disability Accommodations Department is considered confidential.

Documentation should be turned in at the Disability Accommodations Office.

Psychological Disabilities

Students seeking support services from Disability Accommodations (DA) on the basis of a previously diagnosed psychological disability must submit documentation that verifies their eligibility under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act. The documentation must describe a disabling condition, which is defined by the presence of substantial limitations in one or more major life activities. Merely submitting evidence of a diagnosis is not sufficient to warrant academic accommodations. Similarly, nonspecific diagnoses, such as “adjustment problems,” “emotional difficulties,” “mood disturbance” and/or “test difficulty/anxiety” in and of themselves, do not constitute a disability. The guidelines below are intended to allow DA to determine eligibility for services and appropriate accommodations. A verification form is also available to provide guidance in the assessment process. A comprehensive report of any testing conducted (including test scores, if relevant) should be included with the verification form.

1. DSM-5 or ICD Diagnosis (text and code), given based on a formal assessment of current psychological and health status, and a formal diagnosis of a disabling condition provided by a licensed treatment provider (e.g., psychiatrist, licensed clinical psychologist, licensed social worker, etc.) Licensed treatment provider should not be related to the individual being assessed. In order to establish a history of the condition and recency of evaluation:

a. Date of diagnosis.

b. Date of last contact. The assessment must be current. Accommodations are based on an assessment of the current nature and impact of your disability. Because psychological conditions may change over time, current evaluations are critical for providing reasonable accommodations. In general, this means that evaluations must have been completed within the last twelve (12) months prior to accommodation requests. In addition, depending on the nature of the disability, evaluations may need to be updated on a semester-by-semester or yearly basis.

2. Comprehensive Evaluation

a. A diagnostic interview and other tools used to determine relevant background in support of that diagnosis.

b. The evaluation should include treatments (e.g., medication, therapy) currently in use and provide a description of the expected progression of the disability over time (i.e., permanent/chronic vs. short-term/temporary). Information on medication side effects is useful and may be considered in accommodation decisions.

c. Onset, history, and prognosis of diagnosis and symptoms.

3. Functional limitations: should be determined without consideration of mitigating measures (i.e. medication, etc.). If condition is episodic in nature, level of functioning should be assessed based on active phase of symptoms. 

a. Major life activities that are functionally limited by the individual’s symptoms.

b/c. Behavioral manifestations of the diagnosis that functionally limits the individual in the academic setting.  Information to consider includes the severity pervasiveness, and frequency of symptoms.

d. Any special considerations that should be made (i.e. side effects of medication, etc.)

4. Accommodations: a description of accommodations and services used in the past and recommended accommodations for the future. It is important to note that Disability Accommodations staff member makes the determination regarding what accommodations are appropriate in the University environment.

The diagnostic report, must include the name and title, and license number of the evaluator. A verification form is available to assist in the documentation process.

All documentation submitted to Disability Accommodations Department is considered confidential.

Documentation should be turned in at the Disability Accommodations Office.

 

 

Temporary Disabilities

Students with temporary injuries (e.g., broken bones, recovery from surgery) are not eligible for formal accommodations, but may benefit from services Disability Accommodations (DA) can coordinate, such as extra time for examinations, use of scribe software and note-taking assistance. Students with such injuries seeking academic assistance should provide supportive documentation to DA and schedule an appointment. The information that should be included in such documentation as outlined below. Individual faculty members have discretion as to whether allowances will be made for missed classes and/or fulfilling course requirements (e.g., examinations, presentations, participation) due to temporary injury or illness. A verification form is also available to provide guidance in the assessment process.

Diagnosis, Injury, and/or Condition: based on a formal assessment by a qualified provider (e.g., physician, nurse practitioner, physical or occupational therapist):

  1. Date of diagnosis.
  2. Approximate duration of diagnosis/injury/condition.
  3. Functional Limitations: Information on limitations associated with diagnosis, injury, and/or condition.
  4. Accommodations: (Optional) Recommended adjustments.

Any diagnostic reports must include the name and title, and license number of the evaluator. A verification form is available to assist in the documentation process.

All documentation submitted to the Disability Accommodations Office is considered confidential.

Documentation should be turned in at the Disability Accommodations Office.

Math Disability

Before Exam

Students who are claiming a math disability are required to take the mathematics placement examination. Those not qualified to enroll in either intermediate or college algebra should enroll in MAT 0300 Beginning Algebra, and complete the requirements of that course.

For more information about obtaining a math disability, contact Dr. Michael Ellison.

You will also need to fill out the Disability Accommodations Request form.

After Exam

If the director establishes that a bona fide mathematics disability exists, a recommendation will be forwarded to the dean of the School of Natural and Social Sciences to substitute logic (Philosophy 2301) for that requirement. The math disability accommodation satisfies only the General Education requirement, i.e. PHI 2301 for MAT 1302. Accommodation is not extended to courses that require MAT 1302 as a prerequisite. In the event that additional diagnosed disabilities preclude taking logic, another course will be substituted in consultation with the dean and the director.

If the director establishes that a bona fide mathematics disability does not exist, the student must comply with the university’s standard mathematics policy.